Heather Spence, Marine Biologist
Orchestrating Coastal Marine Ecology Investigation and Outreach

Heather Spence, Marine Biologist

Contact

The Listener Heather

Contact Heather Spence by e-mail: info (at) heatherspence (dot) net * or, post a comment (instructions on home page).

* Email addresses are written this way to avoid getting spammed, just substitute in the @ sign and the . sign where indicated when you type the address to write to me.

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DONATIONS:  To make a tax-deductible contribution, see the donations page

STAY TUNED:  To join the STAY TUNED Network: e-mail me with the subject line: TUNE IN

ASK A MARINE BIOLOGIST:  If you have a question for “Ask a marine biologist,” email me or submit it as a comment

YOU TUBE:  You can also find Heather on You Tube:  www.youtube.com/heatherruthspence

TWITER:  And on Twitter: @heatherspence


TUMBLR:  And Bunny Cartoons on Tumblr:  www.heathers2pence.tumblr.com

FACEBOOK: Check out the GRACIASS group

ABOUT ME:  And find out more about Heather by reading Heather’s Bio

And buy cool stuff on my cafepress site

Looking forward to hearing from you!

“The investigation of truth is in one way hard and in another way easy. An indication of this is found in the fact that no one is able to attain the truth entirely, while on the other hand no one fails entirely, but everyone says something true about the nature of things, and by the union of all a considerable amount is amassed.”
~Aristotle

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78 Responses to “Contact”

  1. comment number 1 by: kyle s.

    I found a bone near Galveston and I don’t know what it is. It’s the size of my open hand and shaped like a spade, kind of like a shark fin. The spade area is about a half inch thick and at the bottom of the spade on each end is what I

  2. comment number 2 by: kyle s.

    I found a bone near Galveston and I don’t know what it is. It’s the size of my open hand and shaped like a spade, kind of like a shark fin. The spade area is about a half inch thick and at the bottom of the spade on each end is what I

  3. comment number 3 by: kyle s.

    I found a bone near Galveston and I don’t know what it is. It’s the size of my open hand and shaped like a spade, kind of like a shark fin. The spade area is about a half inch thick at thinnest and at the bottom of the spade on each end is what I can only describe as a joint or spinal connection. I googled fish and whale skeletons but I don’t see anything similar. The only thing I can see it might resemble from that area is a cow’s scapula. My friend has it right now so I don’t have a pic but I will try and get one asap.
    Sorry for the double post, my computer has AIDS. Thank you for taking the time to read this.

  4. comment number 4 by: Heather

    Kyle,
    A picture would certainly help. It sounds like an interesting find!
    Heather

  5. comment number 5 by: greg burger

    hi heather

  6. comment number 6 by: greg burger

    Hi Heather i raise salt water fish in aquarium and was wandering if u think they are over harvested off freefs. i have heard they do it in a responcible way , was wandering if u knew a a good medicine for a quarteen tank , that would not hurt the new fish ,, i try to buy tank raised fish but dont trust all informa tion by breeders thank you for any advise

  7. comment number 7 by: Heather

    Hi Greg,
    Nice to hear from you. Salt water aquariums can be extremely difficult to maintain! When it comes to finding fish, I have a couple of important suggestions. One is to only buy and keep native species. The Lionfish invasion in the Caribbean is an example of what happens when you take a Pacific fish and keep it as pets on the Atlantic side – they escaped, restulting in a horrible invasion that’s really unnecessary. So that’s one suggestion. Another is that you might look into where ornamental fish are bred. Find a place near you if you can, and see if you can visit. There may be one associated with a university or research group that could give you good information and suggest to you good places to buy your fish and supplies, and what medicine you might need.
    I hope this helps,
    Heather

  8. comment number 8 by: ri

    It’s a nice blog you have over here! It’s very useful information for me and I just want to thank you for that!

  9. comment number 9 by: Rebecca Parkin

    hey:), im becca im 15 and go to the king edmund school and im doing a project on marine biology at school and i need your help with some information o if you could contact me please it would be helpful i posted yesterday but it seems to be deleted , So i though i’d post again i just need to ask some question and find out a bit more information than i already have , so if you contact me on my e-mail address that would be great thank’s:)

  10. comment number 10 by: Rebecca Parkin

    hey:), im becca im 15 and go to the king edmund school and im doing a project on marine biology at school and i need your help with some information o if you could contact me please it would be helpful i posted yesterday but it seems to be deleted , So i though i’d post again i just need to ask some question and find out a bit more information than i already have , so if you contact me on my e-mail address that would be great thank’s:)

  11. comment number 11 by: Heather

    Hi Rebecca, Thanks for contacting me and I’m glad to hear of your interest in marine biology. Please email me with your questions, or, you can post them here.
    Heather

  12. comment number 12 by: lauren knoell

    hi heather my name is lauren i emailed you and i really need to get my rpoject done its due monday so if u check this site more than you check ur email then i am leaving a comment with the questions thx plaz respond.

    here are the questions…..

    1. on a scale of 1-10,10 being the highest,how much do you use the following in your job

    reading__ writing__ math__ computer skills__ Science__ speaking__ listening__teamwork__

    2.what is the place of your employment?

    3.how did you become aware of this occupation?

    4.why did you choose this career?

    5.what natural skills or talents helped you to get this job?

    6.what level of education or special training is needed for this job

    7.what are your job benefits?(insurance,discounts,ect)

  13. comment number 13 by: Heather

    Hi Lauren,
    Thank you for contacting me. I am glad you are interested in marine Biology.
    My job is actually a lot of different things, including teaching, researching, studying, writing, and much more. I need to use the top level of skills in every category: reading (10), writing (10), math (10), computer skills (10), Science (10), speaking (10), listening (10), teamwork (10).
    My work takes me to several centers in New York City as well as Baltimore and the Ycatan in Mexico.
    Marine Biology always interested me, so when I was in college I was happy to get the opportunity to do a special research prohect in the field, and I worked with other Marine Biologists. It was so fascinating, I finished college and continued on to graduate school in Marine Biology. In the work that I do, listening is especially important. I concentrate on acoustics because I like to listen and I think I am good at it, which is why I am also a musician.
    My education will always continue because there will be new things to learn as long as I am in Marine Biology. Most Marine Biologists probably have at least a Masters Degree.
    The benefits of each job have to do with where you work more than what your specialty is. I work at a university but there are all kinds of jobs for Marine Biologists. Yes, I have insurance, and I get discounts on many things as well.
    I hope this helps.
    Good luck!
    Heather

  14. comment number 14 by: Rebecca

    Hey Heather, it’s me again i just want to know:
    Is it hard to train to be a marine biologist?
    What qualifications do you need to be a marine biologist?
    Would you have to go collage to train?
    What sort of training would you have to do?
    Would you have to go to university to become a marine biologist?
    Many thank’s
    Becca

  15. comment number 15 by: Rebecca

    Hey Heather, :)it’s me again i just want to know:
    Is it hard to train to be a marine biologist?
    What qualifications do you need to be a marine biologist?
    Would you have to go collage to train?
    What sort of training would you have to do?
    Would you have to go to university to become a marine biologist?
    Many thank’s
    Becca

  16. comment number 16 by: Emma Elliott

    Hi Heather Spence,
    I am Emma Elliott and I live in Pennsylvania. Im a 10th grader and was assigned a project to research Marine Biology in my biology class. I’d like to interview you about your career as a marine biologist. If you are interested in helping me, please see the interview questions bellow:

    1) What education did you have
    before, to get this job?

    2) What was you very first job in this
    field?

    3) What’s a typical day for you?

    4) Why did you choose
    Marine biology?

    5) What is your job satisfaction?

    P.s I’d like for you to get back to me as soon as possible, if that is okay. Thank you very much!!

  17. comment number 17 by: Morghan

    Dear Heather,
    My name is Morghan Pereira, and I am a sophmore at Berean Christian High School in Walnut Creek, California. I have a research project coming up in English class, and I have to do an interview. You seemed very qualified. If you could answer these questions, I would be so greatful! If I could get answers to these questions before November 3th that would be so helpful! Thank you!

    1. What inspired you to pursue this job for a career?
    2. What schooling, training, skills, experience, etc. did you need to get the job you have? Is that still the case, or have the requirements changed?
    3. How long have you been in this field? How has your job evolved since you first started (promotions, new responsibilities, etc.)?
    4. Tell me what a typical day is like in your job. Does that vary over weeks/months/years/etc.?
    5. What is your schedule like? Do you get paid vacation? Holidays?
    6. What does your place of employment look like? (E.g. do you work in an office, etc.?)
    7. What are the benefits of your job, both external (such as medical, bonuses, etc.) and internal (such as convenience, location, personal reward, etc.)?
    8. What do you enjoy most about your job? What do you enjoy least?
    9. Where do you see yourself in five years? In ten years?
    10. What advice do you have for someone considering your job as a future career?
    11. What would someone entering the field make? Salary Range?
    12. How time consuming is the job? What are the hours? Are they consistent or flexible?
    13. What college courses (and high school) do you recommend for this particular field? Are there certain colleges that are better to attend than others?
    14. What are the age requirements to enter this field?
    15. Do you travel a lot for your job?
    16. Is the work you do personal or do you have people you team with to get a job done?
    17. Do you have to relocate for your job? Does it take over your lifestyle?

    Thank you so much!

    God Bless,
    Morghan

  18. comment number 18 by: Heather

    Hi Morghan,
    Thank you for contacting me. I am glad you are interested in interviewing a Marine Biologist. In English!

    My career as a Marine Biologist was inspired by my interest in the creatures that live in the oceans.

    There are no set requirements to be a Marine Biologist, but most of my colleagues have graduate degrees in science. The skills you need would be determined by the job you do.

    My own experience in marine biology goes back 7-8 years. At that time I was an undergraduate. Since then I have expanded my research and taken on a lot of new responsibilities. I also get paid more and travel to more places.

    My ‘typical’ day is never the same twice. I teach and study and do research, i go to different places in New York City and Baltimore and Mexico, and sometimes other states, too.

    My schedule is mostly up to me. I get paid to work the way I think it needs to be done. Sometimes that means I am working on a holiday, and other times I am relaxing when others are working.

    My work is in offices, classrooms, aquariums, oceans, beaches, boats – almost anywhere. Of course I also spend time on a computer.

    My job does give me advantages such as health care and travel, and I get to decide where I want to go, so it is convenient.

    The best part of my job is that I do what I like best. The worst part is that I always have to ask for enough funding.

    In five years, I hope to have established an official institute for sustainability studies. In ten years, I hope we will be an important center for developing interdisciplinary solutions to sustainability problems.

    Anyone who wants a career like mine should volunteer with me. We need lots of help! Seriously, there are many paths you can follow to become a Marine Biologist, and many different career choices. Some make more money than others.

    On the plus side, my hours are flexible. They are also usually long, although mostly that is my choice.

    To prepare for a career in marine biology, study science. Take science courses in high school and college. It is more important to do well and get a good background than to go to a particular university.

    My research is mostly done in teams, although some things I just do myself. I prefer teamwork. Sometimes we physically get together and other times we just get on the computer.

    Relocating is up to me, depending on what and where I choose to study. My work is part of my lifestyle, by my own choice.

    Good luck on your project!
    Heather

  19. comment number 19 by: Krystine

    Good day Ms. Heather! I’m Krystine from the Philippines. I was wondering if you could answer some interview questions for our research and investigatory project about increasing the population of phytoplanktons. Our group was required to interview 2-3 professionals. Would you please grant us the opportunity by answering these interview questions? I sent these questions in your email as well. Hope you have the time Ms. Heather :)

    Our Research problem or topic is:
    The effect of Iron (III) Oxide on the population of phytoplanktons.

    1) What do you think of our research topic?

    2) Is our research worth doing?

    3) Do you think that we would get a successful result?

    4) What are the possible strengths and weaknesses in our Research?

    5) Do you think our research is significant?

    6) What type of plankton would you prefer for us to use in the experiment proper?

    God Bless! :) And Thanks a lot. :)

  20. comment number 20 by: Virginie, Shelbey, Josee

    Hi Heather!
    We are three 13 year old girls from Canada, and we are doing a project on Marine Biology and one of the hardest questions on our research is What do seaweed eat? And how?
    It would really really help us if you answered!
    Thank you!

  21. comment number 21 by: Heather

    Hi Krystine,
    Good to hear from you and I’m glad you are working on a science project. What made you decide to look at this particular question? What is your experimental design? If you have made an observation or done background research that leads you to be interested in finding out more about this, then it is a good question. The next thing is to design a good way to go about testing your hypothesis (what do you think the effect will be?)
    If you are going to be testing different levels of Iron Oxide, I would advise you to think about the significance of the amounts that you use (likelihood of finding that level in nature? a previous study used it? etc), and make sure you include a control group!
    Heather

  22. comment number 22 by: Heather

    Hi Virginie Shelbey and Josee,
    Seaweed is a plant. Like plants that grow on land, plants that live in the water are “autrophs” – they make their own food using energy from the environment (especially from the sun).
    Heather

  23. comment number 23 by: Morghan

    I was so glad to hear back from you! Thank you so much, Heather! You helped me a lot on my project!

    Thanks again!
    Morghan

  24. comment number 24 by: Emily

    Hey Ms. Heather! I’ve got a few questions regarding phytoplanktons. If you have time please answer.

    1)What is the most common type of Phytoplankton?
    2)Easiest to obtain phytoplankton?
    3)Easiest to grow for an experiment?
    4)What is a common or cheap growth medium for phytoplanktons?
    5)Are phytoplanktons in danger of being endangered?
    6)Could you give some importance of phytoplanktons?

    Thank you. :)

  25. comment number 25 by: Becca Parkin

    Hey Heather, it’s me again i just want to know:
    Is it hard to train to be a marine biologist?
    What qualifications do you need to be a marine biologist?
    Would you have to go collage to train?
    What sort of training would you have to do?
    Would you have to go to university to become a marine biologist?
    Many thank’s
    Becca

  26. comment number 26 by: sriram

    hi heather what is the qualification to become marine biologist

  27. comment number 27 by: Sarah K.

    Dear Heather Spence,

    My name is Sarah and I am in the 8th grade. I sent you this message as an e-mail but I really wanted to see if I could get an answer and decided to make a post also. I was doing a project in science involving fish tanks and plants. The plants we used were Red Ludwigia and each tank received an equal amount of light. We noticed that the tank that had two plants was warmer than than the tank with one plant and the tank with no plants. The tank with one plant was the second warmest. These results came up every time we measured. We didn’t know what was causing this so my science teacher encouraged me to find the answer. Being a marine biologist, I figured you might know. If you do not know, could you please give me the contact information of someone who would? I would appreciate receiving an answer as soon as possible, even if your answer is no.
    Thank you.

    Sincerely,

    Sarah K.

  28. comment number 28 by: danyelle cater

    for my whole life i wanted to become a marine boloist i would like to ask you a few question. you can email me dannilovesrock@gmail.com or call me at 619-252-7805

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